Civil War Soldiers’ Graves Online Database

If you are searching for a Civil War ancestor, this database of Confederate and Union graves is a good place to check.

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

Click on the above image to view a larger version.

The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was the largest fraternal organization for Union veterans. It was a very active organization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Only Union veterans were permitted to join the GAR. As the members aged and then died, the organization eventually disappeared. However, it was replaced by the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, with membership restricted to descendants of Union Civil War veterans. The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War inherited most of the records of the national GAR organization, as well as many of the records of local chapters (called “encampments”).

The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) now has created its Grave Registration Project to document the final resting places of BOTH Union and Confederate Civil War veterans. The fully-searchable database is available…

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Virginia Tech’s Civil War Newspaper Collection is Online

Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

The American Civil War Newspapers website can be a valuable resource for genealogists researching Civil War era ancestors, even those outside of Virginia. The ultimate goal of the American Civil War Newspapers website is to index newspapers from the Civil War era — Northern and Southern, Eastern and Western, urban and rural, white and black — in order to offer a balanced cross-section of opinion, observation, and experience, from all across America.

CivilWarNewpaper

Quoting from the newspaper collection’s web site:

“For many years the newspapers of the Civil War era were probably the most neglected of all sources, and yet they are one of the richest. The reason no doubt lay in the sheer mass of them, their inaccessibility, and the fact that they were not indexed. Few if any scholars had the time or resources to spend weeks and months scanning page by page in the hope of finding something…

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Would You Go to War for $1000?

It’s interesting to see the old recruitment posters for the American Civil War. I’ve seen them in museums at Gettysburg and Richmond.

$1000 bounty civil war recruitment

Photo of a Civil War recruitment poster (taken at a museum).

Usually, the amount of the bounty (bonus) in the 1860s is a few hundred dollars. Sometimes there are multiple bounties to entice recruits. In some cases, the money was paid up front or some held back to be paid at the end of the enlistment.

Having the money at the sign-up time would be good. Then you could leave some for the wife and children to live on while you are away fighting in battles.

recruitment posters

Photo of a Civil War recruitment poster (taken at a museum).

With the monthly pay for a soldier being just $16, you get an idea of the value of money at that time. $1000 is a considerable sum.

I met one genealogist who found that his ancestor changed his name and fought in a different regiment. It made me wonder if he did that to collect more than one bounty. That would certainly complicate your search for that ancestor.

Would $1000 convince you to join the army and march away to war? Search online for recruitment posters for the state and county where your ancestor lived.

Organizing My Research Finds

I recently joined a group called The Organized Genealogist. Seeing what the other researchers are doing inspires me to organize my findings. I’m notorious for piles of papers and need to learn to “file, not pile.”

So… I’ve made file folders with categories like early life, 93rd Indiana, Andersonville, Civil War background information, Tyro, old age.  Since I’m also researching the 100 men that were in Company G with my great-great grandfather, I need a folder just for them. Also I need a folder for his descendants as I find details about the lives of his children and grandchildren.